Navy Cross

                     

   

                                                           

 

Vietnam

 
SSgt. Leon R. Burns  Sgt. Hubert H.  Hunnicutt III   Lcpl. Michael E. Stewart + 
2ndLt.William J. Christman + Capt. William M. Keys      Cpl. James L. Stuckey       
LCpl. Dana C. Darnell   2ndLt. George M. Malone  Cpl. Barry L. Thoryk        
Cpl. Barry W Duff +  Lcpl. Robert Monahon +  HM3 Mack H. Wilhelm
1stLt. Lee R. Herron +  2ndLt. Jettier Rivers Jr+  
Sgt. Walter C. Holmes    Capt. Albert Slater  
1stLt. Gatlin J. Howell + Pfc. Melvin Stewart +  

                            

                                                      

 

Iraq

 
LCpl Jordan C. Haerter +    

 

+ DENOTES POSTHUMOUS AWARD

 

 

 

 

 

Burns, Leon R.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. B, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  July 2, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Staff Sergeant Leon R. burns, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with operations against the enemy while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company B, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division (Reinforced), in the Republic of Vietnam on 2 July 1967. Company B was engaged in a search and destroy operation when it was taken under intense small-arms, automatic weapons, mortar and rocket fire from an estimated two battalions of North Vietnamese troops. In the initial burst of enemy fire, the commanding officer and two platoon commanders became casualties. Immediately reacting to the situation, Staff Sergeant Burns moved his platoon forward only to be pinned down by a heavy volume of small-arms fire from both flanks and the front. He moved through the intense fire, with complete disregard for his own safety, to call in and adjust air strikes against the numerically superior enemy force. The air strikes erupted within fifty meters of his position, disrupting an enemy assault against his flanks. Exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, he organized the remnants of the company into a hasty defense and began treating and evacuating the wounded. Upon being joined by a relief column, he unhesitatingly volunteered to go forward to guide the column and assist in recovering the wounded and dead Marines. After the fulfillment of this mission, he led his men in a withdrawal along the highway. As the column moved along the highway, they were taken under devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire. Again exhibiting fearless leadership, he moved up and down the column encouraging his men and directing them into fighting holes to organize a defense position and personally carried two wounded Marines to the landing zone. By his bold initiative, dauntless courage and exceptional fortitude, Staff Sergeant Burns reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

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Christman, William J., III+
Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  February 22, 1969

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Second Lieutenant William J. Christman, III, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a platoon commander with Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Early on the afternoon of 22 February 1969, Company A was patrolling north of the Ashau Valley in Quang Tri Province when its lead element was pinned down by intense fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force, well concealed in a heavily fortified bunker complex. Reacting instantly, Second Lieutenant Christman deployed his platoon to the right flank of the lead platoon and skillfully maneuvered his men forward in a coordinated attack until halted and pinned down by the extremely heavy volume of cross fire from the North Vietnamese emplacements and numerous sniper positions in trees. He directed the fire of his machine guns and light antitank weapons against the North Vietnamese emplacements and mounted such an aggressive assault that his platoon moved through the forward enemy positions. Undaunted by the enemy rounds impacting around him, he fired his light antitank assault weapon, and fearlessly charging across the fire-swept terrain, hurled hand grenades into a hostile emplacement, killing seven North Vietnamese soldiers and silencing their machine guns. Coming under fire from an adjacent bunker, he was mortally wounded while attempting to fire his light antitank assault weapon against the emplacement. With his remaining strength, he resolutely propped himself up on one arm to direct his men in outflanking and destroying the enemy bunker. His heroic actions inspired his men to such aggressive action in a coordinated company attack that 105 North Vietnamese soldiers were killed and a large bunker complex was destroyed. By his courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Christman upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

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Darnell, Dana C.
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. B, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  April 24, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Lance Corporal Dana C. Darnell, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a 60mm Mortar Ammunition Carrier attached to Company B, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division in the Republic of Vietnam on 24 April 1967. Company B was engaged in a search and destroy operation against the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese forces in Quang Tri Province. Lance Corporal Darnell's platoon was entering a clearing, when it was ambushed by North Vietnamese Army Forces, using heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. As the ambush was sprung, the mortar gunner was knocked unconscious while seeking cover. Exhibiting sound judgment and extraordinary calmness in the face of intense enemy fire, Lance Corporal Darnell retrieved the mortar. Due to the urgency of the situation, he was unable to set the mortar up properly. Holding it between his legs and steadying it with his hands, he began firing the mortar from a position exposed to the enemy fire and delivered accurate fire into the enemy positions. When he had exhausted all of his ammunition, he moved from man to man, collecting mortar ammunition to keep his mortar in action. He repeated this selfless performance many times, until the enemy fire was silenced. At this time, the platoon was ordered to withdraw from the clearing. Lance Corporal Darnell was dragging two wounded Marines from the clearing when he was temporarily blinded by enemy fire, which knocked dirt and rock fragments into his eyes. He refused to be evacuated and within an hour was again assisting in the care of the wounded. By his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and valiant fighting spirit he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Duff, Barry W.+
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. C, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  May 21, 1966

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Corporal Barry W. Duff, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division (Reinforced), in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 May 1966. While on a patrol, Corporal Duff's squad came under intense rifle, machine-gun, mortar, and recoilless rifle fire from a reinforced Viet Cong company. The initial burst of enemy fire caused several casualties. Realizing that the casualties were lying fully exposed to the enemy fire, Corporal Duff immediately moved to a small knoll overlooking the enemy and his wounded comrades. During the next half hour the enemy launched three assaults in an effort to annihilate the wounded Marines and capture their weapons. With complete disregard for his own safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to turn back the enemy's attacks with accurate rifle fire. Although wounded during the second attack when he was shot in the leg and knocked from the knoll, he gathered more ammunition and hand grenades and gallantly regained his position to protect his wounded comrades. He courageously held his position until mortally wounded while exposing himself to throw a hand grenade. By his bold initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Corporal Duff was instrumental in saving his comrades from further injury or possible death, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

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Herron, Lee R.+
First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  February 22, 1969

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to First Lieutenant Lee R. Herron, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Executive Officer, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division in the Republic of Vietnam on 22 February 1969. While patrolling north of the Ashau Valley in Quang Tri Province, the lead elements of Company A came under intense fire and were pinned down by a large North Vietnamese Army force. First Lieutenant Herron maneuvered one of his platoons forward to reinforce the lead elements. When the second platoon commander was seriously wounded, he immediately assumed command and quickly organized the men into an assault force. Skillfully deploying his men, he led them in an aggressive attack until halted and pinned down by an extremely heavy volume of cross-fire from several enemy machine guns augmented by mortar, rocket-propelled grenade, small arms, and automatic weapons fire from the North Vietnamese emplacements, as well as numerous sniper positions in trees in the dense jungle canopy. Undaunted by the hostile rounds impacting around him, First Lieutenant Herron repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he moved among his men to encourage them and urged them to inch forward to positions from which they could deliver more effective return fire. Aware that the fire from two mutually supporting hostile machine guns was holding his Marines in place and preventing the removal of the casualties, he completely disregarded his own safety as he exposed himself to North Vietnamese fire to direct a light antitank assault round which scored a direct hit on one of the machine gun bunkers. Boldly leaping to his feet, he fearlessly charged across the fire-swept terrain to hurl hand grenades and fire his weapon against the enemy emplacement, killing nine North Vietnamese soldiers who were in the bunker. While directing his men in the assault on the remaining bunker, First Lieutenant Herron was mortally wounded by enemy sniper fire. His heroic actions inspired his men to such aggressive action in a coordinated company attack that 105 North Vietnamese soldiers were killed and the large bunker complex destroyed. By his courage, bold initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Herron upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

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Holmes, Walter C.
Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. B, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  December 27, 1965

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Sergeant Walter C. Holmes, United States Marine Corps, for outstanding heroism as a 60mm Mortar Section Leader serving with Company B, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, in Vietnam on 27 December 1965. Sergeant Holmes was providing support for a combat patrol in the vicinity of Da Nang when a force of sixty to eighty well-armed Viet Cong opened fire from concealed positions about fifteen meters away. Situated thirty meters to the rear from where the intense fire immediately felled several Marines, he fearlessly advanced toward the guerrillas, who were positioned along high sand dunes. When the Viet Cong attempted to overrun the patrol, Sergeant Holmes, with relentless fighting spirit, stood his ground and fired with an accuracy that drove back the enemy and provided cover for Marines who were maneuvering forward. Taking a mortar and all the rounds he could carry from a casualty, he aggressively moved to higher ground, directing twelve rounds, in a matter of seconds, at the fleeing Viet Cong. With continued presence of mind, he organized a hasty defense and prepared for medical evacuation and relief forces. By his exceptional courage in the face of extreme peril, Sergeant Holmes saved the patrol from further casualties and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Howell, Gatlin J.+
First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps
1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  July 2 - 7, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to First Lieutenant Gatlin J. Howell, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Intelligence Officer, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division (Reinforced), in the Republic of Vietnam from 2 to 7 July 1967. While manning the command bunker at Con Thien on 2 July, First Lieutenant Howell was closely monitoring the progress of Company B, First Battalion, as it became heavily engaged with an estimated two battalions of North Vietnamese Army Regulars near the Demilitarized Zone. When the unit suffered heavy casualties and was in danger of being overrun, he volunteered to lead a relief force to rescue the beleaguered Marines. Displaying exceptional leadership and tactical skill during his advance, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy mortar and small-arms fire as he kept the relief column intact, pointing out directions of fire for the tanks and providing effective flank security as he moved rapidly to Company B's position. Immediately evaluating the situation when he arrived in the battle area, he established a defensive perimeter and moved to rescue the forward elements of the besieged company. As he searched for the wounded, he observed two men in a hole fifteen meters beyond the friendly lines. With complete disregard for his own safety, First Lieutenant Howell ran through heavy small-arms fire to treat the men and carry them to the safety of the perimeter. When his right flank was threatened by a North Vietnamese squad, he directed heavy fire against the assaulting force, undoubtedly saving the lives of at least three injured Marines caught between the enemy and the friendly lines. Subject to intense enemy mortar and artillery fire and road mines that disabled two tanks, he moved the casualties to the landing zone. After ensuring that the casualty evaluation process was well under way, he refused medical treatment for himself and instead returned to the forward area to determine that all of the wounded had been moved. During a rocket attack on 7 July at Con Thien, First Lieutenant Howell was killed in action. By his intrepid fighting spirit, daring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, First Lieutenant Howell was instrumental in saving many of his fellow Marines from capture, injury or possible death, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service He gallantly gave his life for his country.
 

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Hunnicutt, Hubert H., III
Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. C, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  April 16 -18, 1968

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Sergeant Hubert H. Hill, III, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism on 16 to 18 April 1968 as a squad leader in Company C, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division in connection with operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Participating in the attack against an enemy bunker complex on a hilltop near the Khe Sanh Combat Base when the battalion came under heavy fire, seriously wounding his platoon commander, Sergeant (then Corporal) Hunnicutt treated the officer's wounds and then directed squad members into a bomb crater to await a lull in the enemy activity. When Sergeant Hunnicutt attempted to emerge from the crater, he sustained serious wounds along with other members of his unit, and was unable to leave his position because of the continuing enemy fire raking the area. At dusk he left the position and crawled across the fire-swept terrain to secure medical aid for himself and the other casualties trapped in the bomb crater. En route, Sergeant Hunnicutt discovered his company commander lying in an open area, severely wounded. While attempting to render aid and assistance to the officer, Sergeant Hunnicutt was again wounded. Nonetheless, he was able to fire at the enemy positions and to hurl hand grenades, eventually silencing their fire. At the first rays of dawn, he managed to move the company commander to a covered position and then proceeded to seek medical assistance but, overcome by weakness from loss of blood, fell into a gully where he lay for several hours. Alerted by the sound of an aircraft, he gathered his last remaining strength and attracted the attention of the pilot who thereupon landed, placed Sergeant Hunnicutt aboard the observation craft, and then relayed a message to pinpoint the location of the company commander. By his indomitable courage, his selfless concern for the safety and welfare of his fellow Marines, and his inspiring devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming adversity, Sergeant Hunnicutt upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Keys, William M.
Captain, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. D, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  March 2, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Captain William M. Keys, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Company D, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, while engaged in action against elements of the North Vietnamese Army and insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces during Operation Prairie II in the Cam Lo district of the Republic of Vietnam on 2 March 1967. While on a search and destroy mission, Captain Keys' company made contact with a large enemy force estimated to be two companies in strength. During this contact, the company command post group received heavy automatic-weapons and mortar fire from the rear. Realizing that his rifle platoons were heavily engaged, Captain Keys organized his command group into an assault element and led them against the enemy, who were firing into his position. Personally leading his small group against a numerically superior force, he succeeded in completely overrunning the North Vietnamese, personally killing six and destroying a machine gun position. Immediately following this fire fight he rushed to the rear of his center platoon where he could best direct the deployment of his company. During the next four hours his company repelled attack after attack by a determined enemy. This period found Captain Keys along the entire line of his company, shouting encouragement, shifting forces to meet each new attack, and successfully directing all aspects of his company's firepower and supporting arms. Following the enemy's last attack, Captain Keys immediately reorganized his company and attacked the enemy before they could withdraw to a safe area. While completely overrunning the enemy camp, his company succeeded in killing 183 North Vietnamese soldiers and capturing eight prisoners and nearly 200 weapons. Realizing that the surviving enemy would attempt to circumvent his company during the oncoming darkness and escape to the north, Captain Keys placed his company in a blocking position, thereby forcing the enemy to withdraw into a prearranged zone where they were pounded by air and artillery resulting in 44 more enemy killed. As a result of his professional skill and stirring example, the enemy forces in his area of operations were completely routed. By his daring performance and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, Captain Keys reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
 

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Malone, George M.
Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve)
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  February 22, 1969

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Second Lieutenant George M. Malone, United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a platoon commander with Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Early on the afternoon of 22 February 1969, Second Lieutenant Malone's platoon was moving as the lead element in a company-sized patrol north of the Ashau Valley in Quang Tri Province when it came under intense fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force well concealed in a heavily fortified bunker complex, and was pinned down. Reacting instantly, Second Lieutenant Malone completely disregarded his own safety as he repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire while moving among his men to encourage them and maneuver them out of the fire-swept area. Seriously wounded by fragments from an enemy mortar round, he ignored his own painful injuries as he directed the fire of his machine gunners and grenadiers against the North Vietnamese emplacements. Retrieving the radio from his wounded radio operator, he then led a coordinated assault until his platoon was halted by intense enemy cross-fire of machine guns and mortar, rocket-propelled grenade, small-arms, and automatic weapons fire from bunkers and sniper positions in trees in the dense jungle canopy. With utter disregard for his own safety, he moved about the fire-swept area to transfer the casualties to covered positions and to reorganize his squads. Undaunted by the North Vietnamese rounds impacting around him, Second Lieutenant Malone boldly fired his light antitank assault weapon against an enemy bunker and hurled hand grenades as he fearlessly led four Marines on a daring charge against the hostile emplacement. Although he was again wounded and his four companions became casualties, he continued his attack and successfully destroyed the machine gun position, killing six North Vietnamese soldiers. Weakened by his serious injuries and rendered unable to move, he continued to urge his men forward to exploit their advantage and continue the attack. His heroic actions inspired the Marines to such aggressive action in a coordinated company attack that 105 North Vietnamese soldiers were killed and the large bunker complex was destroyed. By his courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Malone upheld the highest traditions of the Marines Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Rivers, Jettie, Jr.+
First Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. D, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  May 14 - 15, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to First Sergeant Jettie Rivers, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Company First Sergeant while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Ninth Marines in the Republic of Vietnam on 14 and 15 May 1967. While engaged in search-and-destroy operations against units of the North Vietnamese Army, Company D became engaged with an estimated reinforced enemy company and Second Lieutenant (then First Sergeant) Rivers, a member of the company command group, was wounded. Realizing that the enemy had forced a gap between the command group and one platoon and the two rear platoons, he immediately informed the company commander. At dusk the enemy fire and mortar barrages intensified, and as casualties mounted, the two separate elements set up a hasty perimeter of defense. Second Lieutenant Rivers expertly directed his men's fire, placed personnel in strategic positions, and personally participated in repelling the enemy assault. Observing a number of enemy soldiers maneuvering toward the perimeter, he mustered a small force of Marines and personally led them to meet the enemy, killing several of the enemy soldiers. When evacuation of the wounded was completed, Second Lieutenant Rivers requested permission to take the point in an attempt to link up the smaller element with the other two platoons. A short distance from the perimeter, the group encountered withering machine-gun fire which instantly killed the platoon sergeant and seriously wounded the platoon leader. Second Lieutenant Rivers immediately took command of the situation, aiding the wounded and personally pinning down the enemy machine gun while the casualties were removed. Now under complete darkness and subject to continuous enemy crossfire and sporadic mortar barrages, Second Lieutenant Rivers assisted in joining the two units. Discovering that all of the platoon leaders had become casualties, he assisted the company commander in setting up an effective perimeter and personally supervised the medical evacuation preparations. Presently a deadly mortar barrage precipitated an all-out enemy assault on the company. Second Lieutenant Rivers was everywhere encouraging the men, directing fire, assisting the wounded, and distributing ammunition to critical positions. Wounded himself, he continued this pace until late in the afternoon when relief arrived. By his initiative, devotion to duty, and aggressive leadership, he served to inspire all who observed him and was instrumental in saving the lives of many Marines. His great personal valor reflected great credit upon himself, the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


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Monahon, Robert+
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. D, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  May 28, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Lance Corporal Robert Monahan, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division (Reinforced) in operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 28 May 1967. During Operation Prairie IV in Quang Tri Province, Lance Corporal Monahon's platoon was dispatched to reinforce a platoon heavily engaged with an estimated company size unit of North Vietnamese Army Regulars. Approaching to within 100 meters of the besieged platoon, his unit came under heavy automatic, small arms and mortar fire which seriously wounded the point man. Unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own safety, he ran more than thirty meters to the side of the wounded Marine and assisted him to safety. Upon returning to his position, he observed two wounded Marines lying in a path approximately seventy-five meters away. Although the enemy, in entrenched positions to the right of the path, was throwing satchel charges and grenades and delivering machine gun fire directly over the wounded men, Lance Corporal Monahon and a comrade volunteered to go to the aid of the men. Courageously moving forward, he dived for cover as he was hit by machine gun fire. Disregarding his painful wound, he continued forward, and upon reaching the wounded Marines' position found that one man had succumbed to his wounds. After quickly rendering first aid to the other Marine, he, exhibiting exceptional courage and fortitude, picked up a machine gun, rose to one knee and accurately fired a heavy volume of concentrated fire on the enemy bunker, killing three North Vietnamese and silencing their machine gun. During the vicious exchange of fire, Lance Corporal Monahon was mortally wounded. By his dauntless courage, bold initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow Marines, Lance Corporal Monahon served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.



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Sadler, Charles D.
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  May 21, 1966

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Corporal Charles D. Sadler, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Machine Gun Team Leader with the Third Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines in Vietnam on 21 May 1966. Corporal Sadler's platoon participated in a helilift to a position in order to block the withdrawal of a large enemy force operating in the area. When the helicopters landed in an open rice paddy, the area was immediately subjected to intense mortar and automatic weapons fire from Viet Cong positioned on all sides of the landing zone. More than twenty Marine casualties were inflicted in the first few minutes of the savage action. With exceptional composure and presence of mind in the tense situation, Corporal Sadler quickly took charge of his team and began returning fire, fearlessly exposing himself to the enemy to accomplish his task. When supplies of ammunition were depleted, he directed Marines around him to retrieve that which had been carried by the casualties, and twice he braved the withering fire to recover ammunition from wounded men who were lying in the exposed rice paddy. On one occasion he spotted a Viet Cong running from a tree line with a machine gun and reacting instantly, Corporal Sadler stood in the midst of the grazing fire and fired his machine gun from an offhand position, felling the enemy. Finding that only Five other Marines in his immediate vicinity were not dead or wounded, he organized the small group and on two separate occasions attempted to mount an assault against the nearest Viet Cong position. Realizing the futility of further attempts, he judiciously directed the men to dig in and save two magazines of ammunition, ordered all rocket misfires to be stacked in the position for last second detonation, and instructed his men to stand by for a probably physical assault by the enemy. His daring initiative and relentless fighting spirit served to inspire and encourage all who observed him, and were instrumental in preventing the enemy from overrunning the position. His resolute effort contributed in large measure to the eventual entrapment of the enemy force, resulting in fifty-three Viet Cong killed and seventeen weapons captured. By his extraordinary courage in the face of extreme danger, bold initiative, and unwavering dedication to duty throughout, Corporal Sadler upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Slater, Albert C., Jr.
Captain, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  July 6 - 7, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Captain Albert C. Slater, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, during Operation Buffalo in the Republic of Vietnam on 6-7 July 1967. In command of both Companies A and C, he moved his forces into a strategic position north of Con Thien. Shortly before dark, the companies came under extremely heavy barrages of enemy artillery and mortars. During the barrages, Captain Slater fearlessly maneuvered his command into a perimeter where it could counter the attack he was certain would come. With full knowledge of the hazards involved, he ignored the heavy barrages of enemy artillery and personally checked each position to insure that they were secure. When the attack came, by an estimated two battalions of the North Vietnamese Army, Captain Slater unhesitatingly moved to an exposed position where he could properly control the situation. He repeatedly exposed himself to the withering enemy fire in order to better observe the air and artillery support he coordinated for his now surrounded command. For six hours, Captain Slater, with complete disregard for his own personal safety and with full composure and presence of mind, moved from one exposed position to another, giving encouragement and directing the men of his command. He aggressively employed all available fire and personally led his men in hand-to-hand combat through extremely dense underbrush which reduced the action to a man-to-man struggle. Throughout the entire night, Captain Slater, although constantly exposed to enemy artillery, mortars, grenades, and small-arms fire, was always at a strategic point of contact directing his unit and encouraging his men. By his courage, tenacity, and outstanding leadership, Captain Slater brought stability to an otherwise untenable situation, which resulted in at least two hundred North Vietnamese regulars killed with small losses to his command. Captain Slater's daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

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Stewart, Michael E.+
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division

Date of Action:  May 13, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Lance Corporal Michael E. Stewart, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as an Anti-tank Assaultman with the Second Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, on 13 May 1967 in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam. During a search and clear operation in the village of Phu An, Lance Corporal Stewart's company came under heavy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire from a well entrenched North Vietnamese Regular force, estimated at company strength. At the outset, several Marines were killed and others wounded in an area affording them little or no cover from the deadly accurate fire which felled them. Realizing that these Marines could not return unassisted to safety, Lance Corporal Stewart unhesitatingly, with full knowledge of the hazards involved and of the great risk of his own life, left his relatively safe position and crawled alone over fifty meters through open area to were the wounded lay helpless. One man was shot in the face and could not see. With uncommon calmness and bravery and while constantly exposing himself to the withering fire which continued to deplete his company's ranks, he calmed the man and guided him through the hail of bullets to safety. Again, ignoring the deadly accurate fire which had halted his company's advance, he returned to the field where others lay wounded. While dragging a second casualty to the rear, the man was again wounded. Lance Corporal Stewart steadfastly refused to leave the twice wounded Marine. As he daringly continued through the enemy fire toward safety, he was mortally wounded. Through his valiant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of great personal risk, Lance Corporal Stewart saved one Marine from almost certain death and gave his own life helping another. His bold initiative, unswerving devotion to duty and courageous efforts inspired all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
 

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Stuckey, James L.
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. C, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  July 6, 1967

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Corporal James L. Stuckey, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division (Reinforced), in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam on 6 July 1967. While in a defensive position and surrounded by a large North Vietnamese Army force, Corporal (then Lance Corporal) Stuckey's fire team occupied a strategic point on the company's right flank. During one heavy attack, three enemy grenades landed in the fire team's position. Completely disregarding his own safety, Corporal Stuckey unhesitatingly picked up the grenades and hurled them back toward the enemy. As he was throwing the third grenade, it exploded severing his right hand. Despite the painful wound, he steadfastly refused to abandon his position, and courageously continued to fight and encourage his men. Although he evacuated one of his wounded men, Corporal Stuckey refused to seek aid for himself and staunchly repulsed the furious onslaught throughout the night, accepting treatment only when the enemy had withdrawn the following morning. His valiant leadership and courageous fighting spirit served to inspire the men in his platoon to heroic endeavor in repelling the enemy, and reflected the highest credit upon himself and the Marine Corps. By his heroic conduct and fearless devotion to duty, Corporal Stuckey upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


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Thoryk, Barry L.
Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Co. A, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  April 4, 1968

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Corporal Barry L. Thoryk, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 April 1968, Corporal Thoryk was participating in a company assault on Hill 471 near Khe Sanh, when his platoon came under an enemy grenade attack and intense automatic-weapons fire. Although he sustained multiple fragmentation wounds in the initial moments of the attack, Corporal Thoryk refused medical aid and single-handedly launched an aggressive assault against an enemy machine gun position, killing three of its defenders. Having expended his ammunition, he quickly obtained an enemy weapon and delivered fire at two enemy soldiers, killing them as they ran from their position. With complete disregard for his safety, Corporal Thoryk continued to maneuver forward, retrieving enemy hand grenades and throwing them at several hostile positions as he advanced. His courageous actions and steadfast determination were instrumental in seizing the enemy-occupied hill and inspired all who observed him. By his intrepid fighting spirit, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Thoryk upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

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Wilhelm, Mack H. +
Hospitalman Third Class, U.S. Navy
Co. D, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  February 19, 1969

Citation:
The Navy Cross is awarded to Hospitalman Third Class Mack H. Wilhelm, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism on 19 February 1969 as a corpsman serving with Company D, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, Third Marine Division in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. When his company came under a heavy volume of fire from an enemy force occupying a well-concealed bunker complex at the crest of a hill in the northern section of the I Corps Tactical Zone, Petty Officer Wilhelm observed a seriously wounded Marine lying dangerously exposed to the intense hostile fire, and quickly raced across the fire-swept terrain to the side of the casualty. Although Petty Officer Wilhelm was painfully wounded in the shoulder, he skillfully administered emergency first aid to his companion, picked him up and, shielding him with his own body, commenced to carry him to a sheltered position. Once again wounded, this time in the leg, Petty Officer Wilhelm nonetheless managed to evacuate his patient to a relatively safe location. He then returned through the hail of fire to the side of another critically wounded Marine and was in the process of examining the casualty when he, himself, was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy rifle fire. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage, and selfless dedication, Petty Officer Wilhelm was directly instrumental in saving the life of a fellow serviceman. His heroic and determined efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

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Haerter, Jordan C. +
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Weapons Company, 1st Bn., 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division
Date of Action:  April 22, 2008

Citation:
The Navy Cross
is awarded to Lance Corporal Jordan C. Haerter, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a rifleman, 3rd Platoon, Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 22 April 2008. While Lance Corporal Haerter and a fellow Marine manned a sentry post at the Entry Control Point (ECP) for Joint Security Station Nasser in Ramadi, Iraq, a tank truck suddenly began to rapidly negotiate the serpentine concrete obstacles leading to the ECP. Lance Corporal Haerter and his fellow Marine quickly recognized the threat of a suicide bomber driving a truck capable of carrying a large quantity of explosives and posing a major threat to the more than 50 Marines and Iraqi policemen in the Joint Security Station. Lance Corporal Haerter immediately engaged the truck with precise fire from his M4 rifle, while his fellow Marine opened fire with his M249 Squad Automatic Weapon. Ignoring the grave personal risk, Lance Corporal Haerter and his fellow Marine continued their accurate fires, stopping the truck a few feet from their position.  At that instant, the suicide bomber detonated approximately 2,000 pounds of explosives contained in the truck, leveling the ECP and mortally wounding Lance Corporal Haerter. The courageous actions of Lance Corporal Haerter in resolutely defending his post against imminent threat undoubtedly helped save the lives of more than 50 Marines and Iraqi policemen at Joint Security Station Nasser that day. By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, courageous actions, and total devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Haerter reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

 

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